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Paw Print Threaded Glasses Holder

$16.95 $11.99
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SKU: S- 180908

Never be caught without your glasses, or a face mask on hand! With this simple threaded holder, a stunning handcrafted, woven accessory ensures that your essential item is never too far. Accented with colorful thread woven through a delicate metal chain and metal paw print beads on the ends, each glasses holder is beautifully handmade by the women artisans in Guatemala.

  • Thread & metal
  • Keep away from cosmetics,soaps, solvents and excess moisture
  • 28" L (71 cm)
  • Handmade in & fairly traded from Guatemala

Mask A Million ChallengeWe are committed to donating 3,000,000 masks to protect our frontline heroes! Learn More 
Per updated CDC recommendations, doubling face masks, using both disposable and reusable together, can help reduce virus transmission. Face coverings like this one are intended for personal use in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies.)


"We dream of an ideal world -- one where everyone lives in harmony, where diversity is celebrated, and where rights and responsibilities are treasured. These aspirations encourage us to find solutions in which prosperity and well-being are common to everyone." ~Maria Pacheco

 

Wakami, a fair trade enterprise founded by Cornell University graduate Maria Pacheco, collaborates with five rural artisan groups throughout Guatemala. A strong focus on community development, social entrepreneurship, and fair wages has vastly improved the lives of its eighty women artisans and their families.

Before they joined Wakami, these artisans had no market outlet for their work and no way to generate income. Most live in very small villages where there are no jobs, and many were forced to leave their children behind to take work in larger cities. For them, the income generated by Wakami is a dream come true, an opportunity to keep their families together and to send their children to school for the first time.

Located in the tiny village of San Lorenzo Pastores, Concepcion became Wakami's first artisan group in 2006. Economic opportunities were slim in the village then, and an important nutrition program was coming to an end -- jeopardizing the very health of the children. Local moms came together to find a solution, and Concepcion was born. The group has become very successful making and selling jewelry, and their families' lives have improved markedly. Inspired by their success and eager to apply their new business skills, Concepcion has opened a bakery and convenience store. "It has taken a lot of effort to start a business, but now, everybody in the village admires us," says group member Matilde. "We have been able to start something, that today is small, but in the future is going to be something really big. We know we still have to make a lot of sacrifices and work hard, but we are happy, because we can see the results every day."

The Monte Redondo group resides in Guatemala's central area, about 20 km from Guatemala City. Despite their close proximity to a large urban area, the community was as isolated as any in the remotest jungle. Twenty women artisans now belong to the group, supplementing their husbands' meager incomes. Group leader Sandra Solares puts it this way: "Wakami is a dream come true for my community. I feel satisfied to be the bridge that makes it possible for women in my community to generate income; this not only makes them feel important, but also helps them provide a better life to their kids. For me, Wakami is the force that gives me the opportunity to keep studying my communication career at the university."

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